As users start bringing back equipment they've been using to work from home, how would you recommend cleaning / disinfecting laptops, monitors, keyboards and mice? Thank you! Mark

Go to the profile of Mark Copeland
Mark Copeland on Apr 29, 2020 • 7 answer
• 0
This question has no further details.

Answers

Hi Mark, this is a good question. We weren't thinking of sanitizing their equipment at first. In the last few days we have started to think of just using disinfected wipes and have users wipe down their own equipment as they come back to office. I am looking forward to more answers and guidance from IT Pack.

Go to the profile of Chirag Shukla
Chirag Shukla on Apr 29, 2020
• 5

If the equipment does need to be used right away, we have been doing it the simple way. When equipment is returned we put it in storage for 3-5 days. All items we have read said the virus sits on equipment potentially up to 3 days. So we've NOT been sanitizing the equipment but instead just letting the equipment sit unused for at least that period of time.

Now if you're talking people returning to work along with their equipment, that is a different story. Since they will be the only ones to continue to use their equipment our plan was to also NOT sanitize it. If IT has to help them set their equipment up then we will be sanitizing the equipment or taking precautions for IT personnel.

Go to the profile of Mark Hayes
Mark Hayes on Apr 29, 2020
• 5

The CDC's guidance (below) on sterilizing electronics is, as you would expect, general and more "read the label" than anything. Personally I would try to store hard, non-porous equipment for at least five days before re-deploying, if I had that option.

"For electronics such as cell phones, tablets, touch screens, remote controls, and keyboards, remove visible contamination if present.

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products.

Consider use of wipeable covers for electronics.

If no manufacturer guidance is available, consider the use of alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol to disinfect touch screens. Dry surfaces thoroughly to avoid pooling of liquids."

Go to the profile of Allen Look
Allen Look on Apr 29, 2020
• 5

Non chemical sterilization can be done without harm to electronics with either UV light or Ozone exposure. Home use devices for each are available to the public.

Go to the profile of Charles Green
Charles Green on Apr 29, 2020
• 4

Below are some suggestions/recommendations that my team collected for cleaning and disinfecting electronic devices combined from Dell, Xerox, CDC, etc.

Our biggest challenge is finding isopropyl alcohol. We may consider UV or Ozone options, depending on availability of those devices as well.

In some cases, where we can, we are just storing the device for a few days. From various sources (e.g. https://www.webmd.com/lung/how-long-covid-19-lives-on-surfaces), it appears COVID-19 can survive up to 5 days on various surfaces, but there are a lot of unknowns.

The CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cleaning-disinfection.html) suggests:

For electronics such as cell phones, tablets, touch screens, remote controls, and keyboards, remove visible contamination if present.
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products.
Consider use of wipeable covers for electronics.
If no manufacturer guidance is available, consider the use of alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol to disinfect touch screens. Dry surfaces thoroughly to avoid pooling of liquids.

Our collection from various vendors:

With the latest public health concerns over COVID-19 disease, we understand there could be some questions about cleaning and disinfecting electronic devices, such as PCs, laptops, tablets, monitors, display and touch screens, cellphones, printers, docking stations, keyboards, and mice.

Note: When considering how to clean or disinfect electronics, you should always check the manufacturer’s instructions first, as the use of some products is not advised and if device gets damaged, it could result in the nullification of any warranties.

Here some basic recommendations:
1. Wear disposable gloves when cleaning and disinfecting any surfaces.
2. Turn off the device you plan to clean and disconnect from AC power. Also remove batteries from items like wireless keyboards. Never clean a device while it is powered on or plugged in.
3. Disconnect any external devices.
4. When cleaning wired keyboards and mice – disconnect first.
5. Never spray any liquids directly onto the electronics.
6. If no other specific cleaning solution is recommended or available, use a warm, slightly soapy water or mixture of 70% isopropyl alcohol / 30% water.
7. Use slightly dampened microfiber cloth to clean surfaces. Excess moisture should be removed if the cloth is wet before wiping the product. Using any material other than a microfiber cloth could cause damage to your devices.
8. Gently wipe the moistened cloth on the surfaces to be cleaned. Do not allow any moisture to drip into areas like keyboards, display panels, etc. Moisture entering the inside of an electronic product can cause damage to the product. Excessive wiping potentially could lead to damaging some surfaces.
9. When cleaning a display screen, carefully wipe in one direction, moving from the top of the display to the bottom.
10. Surfaces must be completely air-dried before turning the device on after cleaning. No moisture should be visible on the surfaces of the product before it is powered on or plugged in.
11. After cleaning or disinfecting a glass surface, it may be cleaned again using a glass cleaner designed especially for display surfaces and following directions for that specific cleaner. We recommend you avoid glass cleaning products containing Ammonia.
12. Discard the disposable gloves used after each cleaning. Wash your hands immediately after gloves are removed and disposed.

Never use any of the following chemicals or products containing these chemicals, as they can cause permanent damage to some surfaces:
• Any chlorine-based cleaner, such as bleach
• Peroxides (including hydrogen peroxide)
• Solvents such as; acetone, paint thinner, benzene, methylene chloride or toluene
• Ammonia (i.e. Windex)
• Ethyl alcohol

It is important to know how to handle isopropyl alcohol in a safe manner.
• Avoid contact with skin, eyes, and clothing.
• Keep away from heat and sources of ignition.
• Use with adequate ventilation.
• Store in a cool, well-ventilated place. Keep container tightly closed.
• In the event of contact with isopropyl alcohol, wash skin thoroughly with soap and water.

Other Precautions

Usage of high levels of alcohol may result in color unevenness, discoloration, cracks in the surface, or blurs. Be sure to follow the precautions above and try the cleaning on an inconspicuous area first.

Go to the profile of Bill Nixon
Bill Nixon on Apr 29, 2020
• 3

How about setting the equipment out in the sunlight for about 30 minutes? Would that be easy and just as effective??

Go to the profile of Dave Robinson
Dave Robinson on Apr 30, 2020
• 0

We are utilizing UV light and time. We're doing this for all incoming shipments and even for reusable masks so they can be worn again after being disinfected. Time will tell if it's working.

Go to the profile of Joel Gibbons
Joel Gibbons on May 21, 2020
• 1